Course Catalog

Course Catalog

Weber Online Courses 7-8

This class includes 4 quarters of study. The business quarter will include computer spreadsheets, word-processing, slide-show presentations, marketing, and familiarize students with career opportunities in the business world. The Family and Consumer Science quarter will deal with consumer and occupational home economics in the areas of life skills, families, childcare, textiles, and food and nutrition. The technology quarter will introduce students to drafting, manufacturing, transportation, principles of flight, shop safety and construction, and careers in the technology areas. The Careers quarter will help students understand the importance of education and occupational decision making.
This course is aligned to the Utah ELA Core standards. An emphasis is placed on reading and writing informational text, digital reading and writing, and multi-media production. Reading comprehension, including analyzing for credible evidence and sound reasoning are a major focus of the course. Work in this course includes writing narrative, expository, and opinion/argumentation pieces. Students are expected to create projects and documents to demonstrate what they have learned, in addition to taking and passing tests.
In grade 7, instructional time is focused on four critical areas: (1) developing an understanding of and applying proportional relationships; (2) developing an understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; (3) solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; (4) drawing inferences about populations based on samples.
The study of Utah permits students to understand the place they call home, while developing essential social studies skills. Students will explore Utah’s unique landscape as they study both the physical and human characteristics that make up our great state. Topics include Native American cultures, exploration, westward expansion, settlement, industry, and statehood. In particular, students will focus on connecting historic topics to their greater influence on the development of our state to the present era.
The seventh grade Utah Science with Engineering Education standards look for relationships of cause and effect which enable students to pinpoint mechanisms of nature and allow them to make predictions. This year in science students will study: a) forces interact with matter; b) changes to earth over time; c) structure and function of life; d) Reproduction and heredity; and e) changes in species over time. Science education includes three dimensions of science understanding: science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas.
This course includes the introduction to beginning skills in a variety of activities to develop a foundation for future fitness.
Language Arts classes will be aligned to the Utah Core standards. Work will be rigorous, relevant, and complex. Students will be writing narrative, information/explanative, and opinion/argumentation pieces. There will be increased emphasis on reading and writing informational text. There will be a greater focus on digital reading, writing, and multi-media production. A greater emphasis will be placed on reading comprehension, including analyzing for credible evidence and sound reasoning. Finally, students will be expected to create projects and documents to demonstrate what they have learned, in addition to taking and passing tests.
In Grade 8, instructional time is focused on three critical areas: (1) formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; (2) grasping the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships; (3) analyzing two- and three- dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding
U.S. History I will focus on the development of the United States from the pre-Columbian Era through Reconstruction. The development of U.S. Geography overtime will accompany the following topics: Native Americans, exploration, colonization, the American Revolution, confederation & the Constitution, slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Students will use a variety of material, including primary sources, to analyze historical events and their impact on America today.
The eighth grade Utah Science with Engineering Education standards describe the constant interaction of matter and energy in nature. Students will explore: a) how matter and energy interact in the physical world; b) how energy is transferred in physical systems; c) how life systems store and transfer matter and energy; and d) the interactions with natural systems and resources. Science education includes three dimensions of science understanding: science and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas.
This is a required one semester course designed to follow the State Core Curriculum. Wellness, fitness, self-concept, emotional needs, decision-making skills, stress, friends, relationships, dating, mental health and disorders, nutrition, balanced diets, eating disorders, Refusal Skills, drug prevention, peer pressure, communicable and non-communicable diseases, first aid, bullying, child abuse, and internet safety are topics that will be covered. There will also be a week-long abstinence unit requiring parent/guardian consent.
This physical education class includes activities that incorporate a variety of activity styles including sports, dance, to basic fitness.
This course is a foundation to the digital world that provides a broad understanding of key applications, computing fundamentals, and living online. Students will have opportunities to use technology and develop skills that promote creativity, critical thinking, productivity, and collaboration.
Students will learn the basics of critiquing art and use these quality concepts in personal work. Basic drawing skills (perspective, proportion, elements and principles of design) guide course curriculum. We will also cover art history and complete one research based art history project.
Students will review and refine the basics of drawing (perspective, proportion, elements and principles of design), with additional color concepts (paints/color pencils). Students will refine art criticism skills, continuing to use quality concepts to their personal work.
Media Arts students learn how to tell a story with film. You learn how to use shot size and angles to help the audience follow a storyline. We use WeVideo to edit footage for the class. You will learn how to write a screenplay. Our big movie projects include recreating a scene from a movie, and working with greenscreens and color keying.
An introductory course. Students will learn basic performing and public speaking skills. Students will work with others as well as independently to explore pantomime, stage acting, script writing, presenting, and ensemble rehearsal techniques in a safe and fun environment. A main goal of this course is to build confidence and develop 21st century skills that will enhance students’ abilities in all areas of their education
FACS Exploration A/B. In this course you will develop skills and be introduced to career pathways in Family and Consumer Sciences. We will explore interior design, clothing and textile construction, fashion design, as well as the fast growing world of free enterprise. You will create projects including a shoebox room design, monster doll, and drawstring bag. You will develop skills and be introduced to career pathways in Family and Consumer Sciences. We will explore food and nutrition, family and personal relationships, and childcare. You will participate in food labs, preschool activities, and games and other activities that strengthen family and friend relationships.

Weber Online Courses 9-12

Students will develop skills and understanding relating to basic elements and concepts of double-entry accounting systems. Skills include understanding the accounting equation, analyzing business transactions, entering transactions in journals, posting to ledgers, compiling end-of-period financial statements, preparing closing entries, and managing cash.Teacher: Jessica Baxter Course: 28243
Adult Roles and Financial Literacy is a fun course that combines growing up and becoming an adult with the concepts of managing our money and preparing for the future we are creating. Students will learn about self management, dating, marriage and parenting, as well as tips on getting a job, how to manage their finances and saving for retirement (just to name a few). By taking this course, and passing all four quarters, students will earn .5 credits in CTE and their .5 credit of General Financial Literacy credit needed for graduation.Teacher: Ashley Blaisdell Course: 43337
This course is designed to meet the requirement for the biological science credit. The standards and objectives for this course are the same as the standards and objectives for Biology, with the only difference being the degree of emphasis on agriculture. Students completing this course will be cognizant of current technologies, methods, and changes in agricultural science and are expected to know and apply the standards outlined in the core curriculum as they relate to the industry of agriculture.Teacher: Hailey Bass, Hailee Toone Course: 72317
Learn how to communicate in a real-life after-school setting. In this class, we will learn how to formulate professional resumes, compose proper emails, and develop and practice effective oral communication skills. Students enrolled in this course will receive 12th grade English credit upon completion and will gain a greater appreciation and understanding of common agricultural practices.Teacher: Jarvis Pace Course: 84050
This course is an entry-level course for High School Visual Arts. It contains new or reviewed material and is a continuation of Visual Art Foundations I from Jr. High or Middle School, with a further emphasis on drawing, color, and design concepts. It's designed to provide an overview and introduction through studying and using a variety of art tools and materials. An emphasis on studio production is designed to develop higher-level thinking, art-related technology skills, art criticism, art history, and aesthetics. The basic goals in the Art Foundations are to creating meaning in works of art and perceiving meanings.Teacher: Stacy Harris Course: 32217
Art II expands upon the elements of art and the principles of design with continued exploration of basic art media and techniques, such as furthering drawing skills, color study, graphic design, and collage. This course will provide you with an overview and introduction to the fine arts, their media, and the cultures they represent. With an emphasis on studio production, this course is designed to help you develop higher-level thinking, art skills.Teacher: Stacy Harris Course: 32219
The Biology Core Curriculum has two primary goals: (1) students will value and use science as a process of obtaining knowledge based on observable evidence, and (2) students’ curiosity will be sustained as they develop and refine the abilities associated with scientific inquiry. The Biology Core has three major concepts: 1.The structures in all living things occur as a result of necessary functions. 2.Interactions of organisms in an environment are determined by the biotic and abiotic components of the environment. 3.Evolution of species occurs over time and is related to the environment in which the species live.Teacher: Hal Raymond Course: 72215
Introduction to basic computing, file management, and Office® products: Word, PowerPoint, and Excel. May also be done in the Google® Suite applications. Learn to be more efficient at reports, spreadsheets, and presentations for your classes and future. 30 wpm keyboarding recommended. FEE: WSD Computer Fee 0.5 DIGITAL STUDIES CREDITTeacher: Dale Pollard, Shawn Potokar, Leanne Green Course: 28223
An introduction to the unifying principles of chemistry and organized around major concepts of matter, structure, energy, and change. Each quarter contains 4 modules. Each module incorporates notes and practices to support learning.Teacher: Julie Rasmussen Course: 72230
Do you ever wish you could return to the simpler times of life when gluing macaroni to paper was considered art and playing with toys was the hardest work you did all day? Then Child Development is the class for you. In this course, you will explore human growth and development, learn about positive guidance techniques, and explore child-related issues and discover solutions for child success. You will explore the life of a child from conception through preschool, exploring development, recognizing growth milestones, and creating experiences that will enhance the development of children.Teacher: Melissa Judkins, Jennifer Roundy, Amy Lloyd Course: 43100
This elective course focuses on world and local issues that affect students' everyday lives, such as economics, government and social conflict. This course uses online news and student research to evaluate news articles and form their own thoughts and opinions on what is happening in the world around them.Teacher: Emma Fernelius Course: 77420
Computer Science PrinciplesTeacher: Jacob Harrison Course: 27401
Digital PhotographyTeacher: Erica Nish, Mindi Silva Course: 84005
Driver Education for Weber Online is the classroom theory part of getting your driver's license. It is intended to take 27 hours to complete.You are required to complete all activities and quizzes for both options to complete this class.• You must be 15 years of age in order to begin the class. • There are 1200 points possible in the class assignments. ◦ You must earn 70% (840) of the total points to complete the course. • You must pass the "Course Assessment" with 70% or higher score. (Those selecting Option B must also pass the Proctored Final test. The total points possible are 1598, and you will need to pass at 70% (1119) of the overall total points to complete the course.)Teacher: Trevor Ward
Earth Systems is an exciting course that offers you the opportunity to study earth, physical, space, and life sciences as they relate to each other. Earth has a myriad of complex, interacting systems that directly influence our lives. These interacting, fascinating systems are the focus of this course.Teacher: Matt Patterson, James Child Course: 72150
Exploring Computer Science (ECS) is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Rather than focusing the entire course on learning particular software tools or programming languages, the course is designed to focus on the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. The goal of ECS is to develop in students the computational thinking practices of algorithm development, problem-solving, and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today's students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers, and societal as well as ethical issues.Teacher: Lance Rhodes, Emily Okerlund Course: 27208
The needs of ninth-grade students transitioning to high school are a fundamental concern to middle-level language arts teachers. The Utah Core focuses on reading and writing experiences that are developmentally appropriate: vocabulary instruction that compares connotation with denotation and identifies word meanings using sentence structure (grammar), reading instruction that focuses on inference and the difference between interesting and important information in informational text, and character development and more complex figurative language in narrative and poetry. Writing focuses on comparing multiple ideas and perspectives to extend thinking through writing and concentrates on persuasive writing in preparation for the Utah Basic Skills Test. Skills in analytical evaluation and assessment of writing become more nuanced, and editing skills are specific and clearly delineated. Inquiry skills are focused on questioning as a research technique and evaluating sources of information.Teacher: Trudy Sportsman Course: 52110
The developmental needs of students approaching young adulthood are critical to secondary language arts teachers. The Utah Core focuses on reading and writing experiences that are developmentally appropriate: vocabulary instruction that evaluates connotation in text and compares and identifies word meanings using analogy and antonym context clues. Because human beings are never too old to improve their reading skills, reading instruction focuses on electronic text, using explicit and implicit information to evaluate informational text; on the ways in which character development and connections to politics, history, and culture contribute to great literature; and on more complex figurative language, including simile, metaphor, pun, symbolism, and personification. Writing focuses on the analysis and interpretation of multiple ideas and perspectives to extend thinking through writing. Persuasive writing is a continued emphasis in preparation for the Utah Basic Skills Test. Skills in analytical evaluation and assessment of writing are further nuanced, and editing skills are specific and clearly delineated. Inquiry skills are focused on synthesizing information in preparation for presenting research results.Teacher: Nick Harris, Steven Godfrey Course: 52210
Eleventh graders are seeking greater and greater independence. Where they are demanding more autonomy and respect as adults, they are still maturing and reaching for adulthood. The Utah Core focuses on reading and writing experiences that are developmentally appropriate. Vocabulary instruction looks at the cultural and contextual meanings of words. Reading instruction continues to offer young adults opportunities for improvement through growing sophistication in interaction with a variety of texts. Writing moves to analysis and interpretation of multiple ideas and perspectives to extend thinking and demands synthesizing of ideas to form conclusions and recommend actions. Analytical evaluation and assessment of writing are further nuanced, and editing skills are more sophisticated and specifically and clearly delineated. Inquiry skills are focused on synthesizing information in preparation for presenting research results. Approved for the Regents Scholarship.Teacher: Melissa Waters Course: 52310
In this course, students will read and analyze fiction, nonfiction, and poetry that focus on the subject of sports. In your study, you will investigate the major themes and tenets of Sports Literature. These themes include sports as a metaphor for the human character and what sport reveals about our culture's values and prejudices.Teacher: Brenda Hart Course: 52411
This course is designed to help students prepare themselves for living in the modern world. Topics covered are Earning, Saving, Spending, and Credit Cards.Teacher: Peter Newbold Course: 28379
Fitness for Life is an individualized, concepts-based, one-semester course designed to give students the knowledge and skills necessary to self-assess, create, conduct, evaluate, and redesign personal fitness programs. It is required of all students and there are no substitutions. Please note: Students may not take this class more than once for credit from Weber Online.Teachers: Jake Shulz, Adam Suttlemeyer, Rachel Campbell, Jesslyn Anderson, Lynn Raymond, Kim Hancey, Terry Schriver, Kevin Ropelato Course: 73210
This course is designed to focus on the science of food and nutrition. Experiences will include food safety and sanitation, culinary technology, food preparation and dietary analysis to develop a healthy lifestyle with pathways to career readiness. Laboratory-based experiences strengthen comprehension of concepts and standards outlined in Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education. Student leadership and competitive events (FCCLA) may be integrated into this course.Teacher: Natalie Wilson, Tena Pate Course: 43210
French 1 focuses on the key areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in French. Each lesson introduces new vocabulary and grammar concepts through listening comprehension, speaking, and writing activities. Students learn to talk about themselves and others, describe their surroundings and use numbers for dates and time. They also learn about culture in various parts of the French-speaking world.Teacher: Trudy Sportsman Course: 35500
Geography is described as the study of the "why of the where." Geography for Life explores how to use geography as a tool to better understand the world in which we live. Students learn to evaluate and question the why and where of spatial perceptions that are read, seen, and heard. The curriculum is best understood when using these geographic themes: location, place, movement, region, and human-environmental interaction. Geography for Life is designed as a semester course, and includes map skills with physical and human geography essentials, beginning with North America, South America, Europe, and their connections to other world regions.Teacher: Scott Wallace Course: 77115
In German 1 students begin learning the basics of their journey into the study of the language of kings, knights, and barbarians. German 1 establishes the foundation for a study of this complex and culturally important language. The student will learn through reading, writing, listening to, and watching videos in German.Teacher: Seth Jones Course: 35230
In German 2 students continue to build upon their German language foundation. Students will not only continue learning to communicate in the German language but will also learn about the history and culture of Germany and Central Europe. Students will learn through reading, writing, listening to, and watching videos in German.Teacher: Seth Jones Course: 35231
Health Education at the high-school level helps students establish patterns of behavior that will assist a person in achieving complete health. Complete health is accomplished by having a balance of physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual well-being. This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to acquire knowledge, incorporate process and life skills, and develop positive attitudes about life. The development of a healthy body and a healthy mind will assist young people in living active, productive, and successful lives.Teacher: Gregg Rasmussen Course: 73320
This introductory course focuses on the principles and elements of design as well as housing needs and an introduction to space planning. Students will have the opportunity to create a portfolio of projects throughout the semester.Teacher: Maren Malan, Kimberlee Arthur Course: 43250
This full-year course provides students with an in-depth study of health care careers including actual clinical experience in a variety of areas. Instruction includes intermediate anatomy & physiology, medical terminology, diseases and disorders, medical ethics and first aid. The class is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Health Science course and/or for a variety of health technology programs.Teacher: Lori Bosley Course: 47380
Mathematical Decision Making is a four-quarter course for high school students. The course includes mathematical decision-making in finance, modeling, probability, and statistics, and making choices. The four quarters of instruction are independent of each other, allowing students to enter and exit the course quarterly. Students will make sense of authentic problems and persevere in solving them. They will reason abstractly and quantitatively while communicating mathematics to others. Students will use appropriate tools, including technology, to model mathematics. Students will use structure and regularity of reasoning to describe mathematical situations and solve problems. The goal of this course is to use your skills abilities from your previous math courses and expand your reasoning into an applied situation.Teacher: Nicole Carroll Course: 62200
This class is based on the Common Core State Standards Initiative. It is meant to replace Elementary Algebra but it also covers some Geometry and Intermediate Algebra. This course deepens and extends understanding of linear relationships, in part by contrasting them with exponential phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend.Teacher: Nicole Carroll Course: 62125
Math 2 builds on students' understanding of number systems, functions, probability, and proofs. Students further their understanding of how to solve equations with newly acquired knowledge of functions - in particular, quadratic functions. The course provides a solid foundation for advancing into higher levels of math.Teacher: Nancy Hales, Alicia Smith Course: 62130
Math 2 builds on students' understanding of number systems, functions, probability, and proofs. Students further their understanding of how to solve equations with newly acquired knowledge of functions - in particular, quadratic functions. The course provides a solid foundation for advancing into higher levels of math.Teacher: Nancy Hales, Alicia Smith Course: 62135
This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles, developing the Laws of Sines and Cosines. Finally, students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.Teacher: Nicole Carroll Course: 62140
This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles, developing the Laws of Sines and Cosines. Finally, students model an array of real-world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.Teacher: Peter Newbold, Alicia Smith Course: 62145
Music Foundations is a general music class geared towards students with or without musical experience. Students will learn the basics of music theory and how music is composed. Students will be exposed to different listening examples that require them to listen actively and respond. In addition, students are asked to attend a musical performance, compose simple melodies on a digital platform, and perform something at a very basic level to demonstrate understanding of concepts taught. The performance can be done on any instrument or played on an online piano using a computer keyboard.Teacher: Niels Hansen Course: 32230
Nutrition 1020 Concurrent EnrollmentTeacher: Helen Marble Course: 43311
The objective of this course is to help students achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness. Students will come to understand that the individual and personal fitness habits they develop and maintain now, can and will help them age more gracefully. Fitness topics such as heart rate, motor skills, aerobic and anaerobic exercise, nutrition, the importance of exercise, and so on, will be covered. Various individualized fitness activities will also be discussed and promoted.Teacher: Madison Campbell Course: 73218
Yoga: This semester-long course is designed to introduce students, safely and accessible, to the basic postures, breathing techniques, and relaxation methods of yoga. Students will begin to experience the benefits of stretching, moving, and breathing freely as they relieve built-up stress, learn to relax, and ultimately get more out of day-to-day life. The aim of this course is to promote vibrant health, reduce stress, and tap into the body’s latent energy reserves.Teacher: Madison Campbell Course: 73218
Physics is a course in applied science that teaches basic physics principles, the math behind these principles and presents applications through lab experiments and other activities. The main topics of study will include motion, forces, work, energy, waves, and electricity.Teacher: Amanda Dahl Course: 72530
Psychology: This course provides an introduction to the broad field of psychology and the many approaches that psychologists take to understanding human behavior. We will consider how psychologists conduct scientific research, with an overview of some of the most important approaches used and topics studied by psychologists, and also consider the variety of fields in which psychologists work and the careers that are available to people with psychology degrees. I expect that you may find that at least some of your preconceptions about psychology will be challenged and changed, and you will learn that psychology is a field that will provide you with new ways of thinking about your own thoughts, feelings, and actions.Teacher: Emma Fernelius Course: 77410
Most people are surrounded by small engines. They are in your lawn mowers, motorcycles, go-carts, scooters, boats, etc. These engines run on a balanced amount of fuel and air, and they need regular maintenance. When service is needed, it is wonderful if you can fix it yourself, or at least sound intelligent when you take it in for its regular service. Small engines are complex, but they are not impossible to understand. As you go through this course, you will learn the basics of what to care for and service. As you tinker and repair, your confidence will grow and you will experiment with other facets of repair and have success there also. So why should you take this course? It will build your self-confidence, help you understand how to repair small engines or appliances, and be personally rewarding when you actually make your first repair.Teacher: Adam Arndt Course: 84250
Spanish 1 is a course designed to give students an introduction to Spanish vocabulary and verbs and how they are used in the present tense. Asking and answering questions, giving basic personal information, and finding your way around town are some of the skills you can learn. Learning a language strictly online is difficult so it is recommended that you find someone with whom you can practice speaking and listening skills in Spanish. These are crucial skills to have so whether you are able to find someone to practice with or you are simply speaking to yourself in the mirror it is vitally important to practice out loud and not just in your head.Teacher: Don Morse, Corey Craynor Course: 35400
Spanish 2 is a continuation of Spanish 1 and expands on your ability to communicate by expressing your ideas, wants and needs and understanding others as they express themselves. New verbs and verb forms are introduced along with much more vocabulary on a variety of topics. Again, speaking and listening are crucial so find a friend with whom you can practice or try speaking to yourself in the mirror. Mimic as best you can the accents and pronunciations you hear in the video presentations.Teacher: Don Morse, Corey Craynor Course: 35401
The goal of this course is to foster informed, responsible participation in public life. Knowing how to be a good citizen is essential to the preservation and improvement of United States democracy. Upon completion of this course, the student will understand the major ideas, protections, privileges, structures, and economic systems that affect the life of a citizen in the United States political system.Teacher: Jacqualynn Acosta, Zachery Venstra Course: 77560
Understanding United States history is essential for the continuation of our democratic society. This course will help students make connections between their world and the rich heritage of United States history.Teacher: Tracy Stokes Course: 77310
In this course students will go through the steps in planning, designing, and implementing a website using current web technologies (i.e., Brackets, HTML, and CSS). For the course project, students will create a website that includes a navigation bar, headings and paragraphs, buttons, images and media, lists, a table, and a form.Teacher: David Kempke Course: 27216
The study of World Civilizations emphasizes the increasing interrelationships over time of the world’s peoples. These interrelationships have developed in two major arenas. First, the relationships have developed among major regions of the world: East Asia, South Asia, Southwest Asia (Middle East), Africa, Europe, North America and Latin America. Second, they have developed within all aspects of human activity: political, economic, social, philosophical and religious, scientific and technological, and artistic.Teacher: Tiffany Shulz Course: 77210
crossmenuchevron-down